Welcome to New York Graffiti!

Welcome to New York Graffiti!

New York Graffiti – NY Graffiti & NYC Graffiti, focusing on graffiti that was started back in the 1970’s in New York City, Hip-Hop at it’s roots. New York Graffiti Clothing Line, Wearable Art! We are here to show you street art from Old School Artists to Current Artists. The site is dedicated to JUST New York which is really where it all began. Check back to see new photos that will be added DAILY, we receive hundreds of photos that need to be scanned before they are posted. We are also looking for any photos of Graffiti Pieces around ALL FIVE BOROS. (PLEASE ONLY NON-COPYRIGHTED images & drawings) and if possible please submit a release statement with all all photos and designs you would allow us to use on the site. The artist or photographer will ALWAYS be credited for their photos and drawings @ NewYorkGraffiti.com PLEASE NOTE: Most of the images have been shared with us from 1000’s of guests users, if you feel that a photo has been posted that is copyrighted please let us know and we will be glad to remove it or display your credit information where is it due. If a tag has been placed wrong on a photo lets us know and we will be glad to update it. We are EXTREMLY fair and care about the art community. Thanks for your interest, send all inquires or photos to:...

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Remembering…Stay High 149

Remembering…Stay High 149

Wayne Roberts, ‘Stay High 149’ in Graffiti Circles, Is Dead at 61 By DAVID GONZALEZ Published: June 12, 2012 by the New York Times Wayne Roberts was a pioneering 1970s graffiti writer known as “Stay High 149” who borrowed the haloed stick figure from the title sequence of the 1960s television series “The Saint,” put a joint in its mouth and turned it around. His “Smoker” tag, or signature, turned the heads of legions of imitators and admirers, including the anonymous teenagers who slipped into train yards at night to paint whole cars, as well as Norman Mailer, who featured him in his book “The Faith of Graffiti.” Mr. Roberts, who disappeared from the scene for some 25 years until he was rediscovered by a new generation of fans and artists in 2000, died on Monday at Calvary Hospital in the Bronx. He was 61. The cause was complications of liver disease, his sister Pauline Noble said. “He was incredibly influential for generations,” said Eric Felisbret, founder of the graffiti archive @149st and author of “Graffiti New York.” “He set the pace for how to do an elegant tag and set yourself apart from other people. It was like corporate branding.” Mr. Roberts was born in Emporia, Va., on Oct. 20, 1950. He never knew his father — not even his name — and moved to Harlem as a child with his mother and his younger brother, Eddie. The family moved to the Bronx in 1966. He recounted on his Web site that by his late teens he was working as a messenger on Wall Street and smoking about an ounce of marijuana a week, earning the Stay High nickname. In his subway travels he noticed other tags — TAKI 183, JOE 182 and PRAY — and followed suit with his own creation, according to his site. He said he could hit as many as 100 trains a day and twice that at night, when he sometimes did larger pieces. “In 1972, Wayne was 22, and he was taking the train to deliver all over the city,” said Chris Pape, a younger graffiti writer and co-author, with Sky Farrell, of Mr. Roberts’s biography, titled “Stay High 149,” published by Gingko Press. “He rode empty trains all day with markers in his pocket, and he wrote everywhere.” Mr. Pape said the Smoker figure was a departure from the tags of...

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Remembering…IZ the Wiz

Remembering…IZ the Wiz

Michael Martin, Subway Graffiti Artist Iz the Wiz, Is Dead at 50 “This is it…..This is it…” By WILLIAM GRIMES Published: June 29, 2009 by the New York Times In the 1970s and ’80s, chances were good that anyone traveling the New York subways rode at least once in a car emblazoned with “Iz the Wiz.” Cryptic but euphonious, often abbreviated to the ultraminimal IZ, the signature could be seen all over the subway system: fat capital letters spray-painted on a door, below a window, across an entire car or even along the full length of a train. Iz the Wiz was a legend among graffiti artists, by almost all accounts “the longest-reigning all-city king in N.Y.C. history,” as the graffiti Web site at 149st.com puts it. In other words, Iz put his name, or tag, on subway cars running on every line in the system more times than any other artist. Michael Martin — Iz the Wiz — died on June 17 in Spring Hill, Fla., where he had moved a few years ago. He was 50. The cause was a heart attack, said Ed Walker, who is working on a biography and documentary of Iz the Wiz. “Look at any movie shot on location in New York from the late 1970s to the early 1980s, and you will very likely see an Iz tag,” Mr. Walker said. “He told me once that in 1982 he went out every night and did at least a hundred throw-ups” — letters filled in quickly with a thin layer of color. “People can’t fathom it.”  Michael Martin, known as Iz the Wiz, was a prolific embellisher of New York subway cars, including this one painted in 1982. Not everyone was appreciative. His career put him on the wrong side of the law — he was issued summonses on several occasions — and of New Yorkers who regarded graffiti as vandalism, not art. But he was a hero to generations of taggers. Mr. Martin started out spraying graffiti on walls and buildings when he was 14, using the tags Scat or FCN, for French Canadian National, although he was not Canadian. He soon graduated to subway cars, specializing in the A line, the longest in the New York subway system. He painted his first cars with the tag Ike — his nickname, Mike, minus the first letter. In 1975, in the 68th...

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The 50 Greatest NYC Graffiti Artists

Having a top 50 list with no explanations just doesn’t work, so I’ve carved the subway movement into sections and tried to work that way—tags, style, throwies, etc. Trying to ?gure out how much weight to give to a category of writing is tough. Even tougher for the writers is that each generation has to surpass the next in quantity and quality. This is particularly tough on writers in the ’80s and ’90s. I think most writers can agree on at least 40 of the writers, after that it probably becomes more subjective. When you get frustrated with my list do what I did, ask yourself which one of these greats would you take off to put in your candidate? Good luck. Let the debate begin. Written by Chris Pape / FREEDOM   50. Ja Neighborhood: New York/Los Angeles Years Active: 1984-present You would think that a writer from the 80s couldn’t make this list with just a throw-up, but Ja did. After kinging New York, he moved to Los Angeles and took that city by storm. He still hasn’t stopped. Amazing. image via 49. Revs Neighborhood: Brooklyn Years Active: early ’80s-present Revs is probably the biggest crossover writer from the subway movement to the street art movement, which is something he refuses to capitalize on. He began hitting subways in the early ’80s and had a decent career. In the late 1980s he teamed up with his partner Cost to do a series of wheat-pasted messages throughout the city. If that wasn’t enough, the duo began using bucket paint to roll their names from rooftops. When Cost retired, Revs decided to write his autobiography in every tunnel in the transit system; it’s still an unfinished work. When he isn’t working on his autobiography, Revs is soddering unique sculptures in the five boroughs. He’s a legend. image via 48. Tats Cru Neighborhood: The Bronx Years Active: early ’80s-present Tats Cru was formed as a subway writing crew in the early 1980s by Brim. Each member of the crew had style to spare, and they were a major presence on the IRT lines. When the subway movement ended, the group disbanded, with members reuniting occasionally to paint walls. In 1996 Tats Cru became an official company with Bg 183, Nicer, and Bio. They’ve been paid well to paint murals around the world and are to the commercial mural world what...

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Remember 5PTZ

Remember 5PTZ

Remembering 5Pointz: A Five-Story Building That Told Plenty More by Bruce Wallace November 21, 2013 5:01 PM The walls of 5Pointz were once covered in graffiti. Artists worldwide came to New York to paint the warehouse surface. (Bruce Wallace for NPR) This week, New York City lost a cultural landmark. The site known as 5Pointz was a graffiti museum, of sorts — the walls of a 200,000-square-foot warehouse complex covered with ever-evolving spray-painted art. It spread across a block in Long Island City right across the water from Manhattan in the borough of Queens. But it was all gone Tuesday. The owner of the building started painting over the art in preparation for demolition. The city had approved construction of two residential towers, despite efforts to designate the complex a culturally-significant structure. Overnight and into the morning, workers covered the art with white paint. A Wall With No Ego Millions of people used to get their first glimpse of 5Pointz from the 7 subway line. When the line emerges in Queens after tunneling under the East River, rows of bright, angular tags would come into view. The walls of the five-story building showcased enormous paintings: a turbaned head wrapped in sky-colored cloth, an orange tiger and, near that, an even-larger-than-real-life portrait of rapper Biggie Smalls. “They call us vandals and hoodlums and whatever you may want to call it,” says 5Pointz artist Jonathan Cohen. “I think it’s quite the opposite.” Cohen started painting here in the early 1990s, and he has been a de facto curator of the art on the buildings since 2002. He thinks it’s the whitewashers who are the vandals. He remembers the origins of the wall: “I said, ‘… Let me start this place up, let me have a wall where no ego is involved, and artists could come paint. Favoritism doesn’t really float. If you do a good job and your piece comes out amazing, it could last longer. If you don’t, then it goes.'” Painters came from around the city, and around the world, to contribute. James Cochran was one of them. He’s a New Zealander living in London. A friend introduced him to Cohen a few years ago, and Cohen invited him to work on a wall at 5Pointz. Cochran painted a portrait of a man in a hoodie. It was aerosol pointalism — meticulously composed of hundreds of different-colored spray dots....

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Graffiti Legends – Part 1

Graffiti Legends – Part 1

The Artists that Sparked a Pop Culture Phenomenon – Part 1 5 graffiti artists that brought street art to the mainstream.   http://feedgrids.com/originals/post/graffiti_legends_artists_that_sparked_pop_culture_phenomenon In Inspiration, by Dimi Arhontidis, February 08, 2010 History: The word GRAFFITI simply means–words or drawings scratched, scribbled or painted on a wall. The word originates from the Greek word “graphein” (to write) and the word “grafitti” itself is plural of the Italian word “graffito.” Graffiti markings have been around since the beginning of time, remnant of early graffiti can be seen in caves all over the world. It represents a human desire and need for communication, and in some cases the simple display of existence. A tag or a mural for graffiti artists is an advertisement for an individual–the goal is to get your name known. You have to have a marketing strategy, what will be the most effective way of getting your name (product) well known, everywhere! Sound familiar? Well it should, because that is exactly what all of us are doing on twitter every day, facebook or any other medium that we use to promote ourselves, our business etc. Companies with money use billboards and TV ads, people with less or no money in the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s used a marker. In part one of a 3 part series, I will talk about 5 individuals that brought street art to the mainstream. Taki 183 What better place to start than Taki 183, who some call the godfather of modern graffiti. TAKI 183 is one of the most influential graffiti writers. His “tag” was short for Demetaki, a Greek alternative for his birth-name Demetrius, and the number 183 came from his address on 183rd Street in Washington Heights. He worked as a foot messenger in New York City and would write his nickname around the New York streets that he frequented during the late 1960s and early 1970s. On July 21, 1971, The New York Times ran an article about him on the front page of its inside section, titled “Taki 183” Spawns Pen Pals. TAKI 183’s newspaper fame spurred competitive tagging in NYC as his tag was being mimicked by hundreds of youth across the five boroughs. The people who got their names up the most and developed signature tags became heroes in their communities. Graffiti became a way for many young kids to communicate and express themselves, their graffiti is a...

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